Lyman Beecher Quotes


 

"That the slave trade must cease is certain."

"No sin has fewer apologies than intemperance."

"What men meant for evil, God meant for good;"

"There can be no doubt that slavery, through the world, is destined to cease."

"But of all the ways to hell, which the feet of deluded mortals tread, that of the intemperate is the most dreary and terrific."

"Great moral events can never be accomplished by single causes, and God has never set his seal to all parts of any complex human plan."

"Happy the man, who so avoids the appearance of evil, as not to shorten his days by what he may call the prudent use of ardent spirits."

"In our own country, it is manifest that slavery must terminate quickly; and we trust that before the close of the present century, the reproach will be wiped away."

Ardent spirits employed to invigorate the intellect, or restore exhausted nature under severe study, is often a fatal experiment. Mighty men have been cast down in this manner never to rise.

"What men meant for evil, God meant for good; and the accomplishment of his comprehensive plan will at last cause the wrath of man to praise him in the civilization and Christianization of Africa."

"Man was to be governed by reason, conscience, and the laws of heaven; and the signs of the times announce, that the day hastens, when every yoke shall be broken, and the oppressed go free."

"That the slave trade must cease soon, is manifest from the movements of Providence.--The power of steam is opening a highway to the heart and the extremities of Africa and commerce, the pioneer of Christianity, has commenced her march, and the angel has lifted the wing for flight, to preach, trumpet-tongued, the everlasting gospel."

"That slavery is wrong, and a great national sin and national calamity, and that as soon as possible it is to be brought to an end, not however, by force, nor by national legislation, nor by fomenting insurrection, nor by the violation of the constitution and the dissolution of the union, but by information, and argument, and moral suasion--and by the spontaneous action of the slave-holding states."

"That the slave trade must cease is certain. Feeble as the moral sense of nations is; and slow as is their movement in a work of justice end mercy, the conscience of nations is beginning to act, and the arm of power to be extended, in earnest, to blot out this long standing shame on humanity."

"Intemperance is the sin of our land, and, with our boundless prosperity, is coming in upon us like a flood; and if anything shall defeat the hopes of the world, which hang upon our experiment of civil liberty, it is that river of fire, which is rolling through the land, destroying the vital air, and extending around an atmosphere of death."

"But of all the ways to hell, which the feet of deluded mortals tread, that of the intemperate is the most dreary and terrific. The demand for artificial stimulus to supply the deficiencies of healthful aliment, is like the rage of thirst, and the ravenous demand of famine. It is famine: for the artificial excitement has become as essential now to strength and cheerfulness, as simple nutrition once was. But nature, taught by habit to require what once she did not need, demands gratification now with a decision inexorable as death, and to most men as irresistible."

"God has made the human body to be sustained by food and sleep, and the mind to be invigorated by effort and the regular healthfulness of the moral system, and the cheering influence of his moral government. And whoever, to sustain the body, or invigorate the mind, or cheer the heart, applies habitually the stimulus of ardent spirits, does violence to the laws of his nature, puts the whole system into disorder, and is intemperate long before the intellect falters, or a muscle is unstrung."

 

Compiled by Thomas George
editor@Wisdom-of-the-Wise.com