Thomas Jefferson Quotes


 

"Delay is preferable to error."

"Bigotry is the disease of ignorance."

"An injured friend is the bitterest of foes."

"We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists."

"The earth belongs to the living, not to the dead."

"Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom."

"Every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle."

"History, in general, only informs us of what bad government is."

"I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past."

"Advertisements contain the only truths to be relied on in a newspaper."

"It is in our lives, and not from our words, that our religion must be read."

"The doctrines of Jesus are simple, and tend all to the happiness of man."

"Conquest is not in our principles. It is inconsistent with our government."

"I believe... that every human mind feels pleasure in doing good to another."

"The moral sense, or conscience, is as much a part of man as his leg or arm."

"We are not to expect to be translated from despotism to liberty in a featherbed."

"All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent."

"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."

"The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them."

"I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty, than those attending too small a degree of it."

"The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government."

"All persons shall have full and free liberty of religious opinion; nor shall any be compelled to frequent or maintain any religious institution."

"Liberty is to the collective body, what health is to every individual body. Without health no pleasure can be tasted by man; without liberty, no happiness can be enjoyed by society."

"Religion is a subject on which I have ever been most scrupulously reserved. I have considered it as a matter between every man and his Maker in which no other, and far less the public, had a right to intermeddle."

"I had rather be shut up in a very modest cottage with my books, my family and a few old friends, dining on simple bacon, and letting the world roll on as it liked, than to occupy the most splendid post, which any human power can give."

"He who permits himself to tell a lie once, finds it much easier to do it a second and third time, till at length it becomes habitual; he tells lies without attending to it, and truths without the world's believing him. This falsehood of tongue leads to that of the heart, and in time depraves all its good dispositions."

"When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation."

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with inherent and inalienable Rights; that among these, are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness; that to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness."

"The most fortunate of us, in our journey through life, frequently meet with calamities and misfortunes which may greatly afflict us; and, to fortify our minds against the attacks of these calamities and misfortunes, should be one of the principal studies and endeavours of our lives. The only method of doing this is to assume a perfect resignation to the Divine will, to consider that whatever does happen, must happen; and that by our uneasiness, we cannot prevent the blow before it does fall, but we may add to its force after it has fallen. These considerations, and others such as these, may enable us in some measure to surmount the difficulties thrown in our way; to bear up with a tolerable degree of patience under this burthen of life; and to proceed with a pious and unshaken resignation, till we arrive at our journey’s end, when we may deliver up our trust into the hands of him who gave it, and receive such reward as to him shall seem proportioned to our merit."

Compiled by Thomas George
editor@Wisdom-of-the-Wise.com